The EU arrest warrant is one of the more offensive aspects of “The Union”. Without the say-so of any British official or any one of Her Majesty’s Ministers, a British citizen can be dragged from his bed before dawn and whisked off prestissimo to some far-flung corner of The Empire on the whim of a foreigner.
Given the chance this particular measure would be one of the first to be abolished in the event (unlikely, I know) of The Huntsman coming to power in this land.

That said, I confess to weakening a little in its favour upon reading this story in The Daily Mail (and elsewhere) concerning a former Communist apparatchik whose appalling crimes may now be about to catch her up, notwithstanding her age. Her victim in this instance was Emil August Fieldorf, Deputy Commander of the Polish Home Army, that gallant band which took on the full might of the German Wehrmacht in the Warsaw Uprising of August 1944 and thus a prime target for liquidation by the Communists. His memorial (he has no known grave) is pictured above.

I hope she will be whisked off to Poland as soon as maybe and, if lawfully convicted, gets to spend the rest of her life contemplating her wickedness in a nice Polish cell. Perhaps then those on the left who have so cheerfully espoused this offensive measure might be made to sit up and pay attention to just how unacceptable this power is and just how EU law works to override our own law. Quite why the Home office felt her crime was unworthy of her being extradited is a matter for conjecture: could it be that as a Communist she enjoys special protection from Labour sympathisers? Surely not….

On the other hand, it would be nice to think that, just as Nazi war criminals are pursued to the grave, Communist criminals from all over the former Communist bloc, whose crimes were, the holocaust apart, far worse than anything fascism managed to achieve, will now be pursued for their crimes in the national courts of their homelands.

An account of her victim’s honoured part in Poland’s history may be found here.

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